Friday, May 19, 2017

RDGED 701 Developmental Reading K-12

Developmental Reading K-12

RDGED 701 Developmental Reading K-12

Online Course 3 semester hours graduate credit 
Instructor: Dr. Paula Harms 

Summer: June 5 - August 18, 2017

Who should enroll?

This course is designed for
  • classroom teachers
  • Title I
  • reading interventionists
  • special education teachers
  • reading specialists
  • school psychologists
  • curriculum directors

You Will Learn

Evidence-based instructional practices to promote
  • word recognition
  • fluency
  • comprehension
  • phonics instruction
  • procedures to assess children's development as they move from emergent literacy to learning to read and into the reading to learn stage
  • the influence of research upon teaching procedures and the selection and use of reading materials for instruction
Course Description: 
Concepts, methods, research, and historical developments that form the foundations of teaching reading. Pedagogical considerations, including general conditions for learning to read and write; developmental phases of reading; principles of good reading instruction; development of a  personal philosophy about teaching reading as a reflective practitioner.
This class will provide a broad understanding of the processes by which students learn to read and write within the context of today's diverse learning communities.
Enroll in this course to meet your goals for
  • professional development
  • license renewal
  • graduate credit electives
  • transfer the credit to another university or reading certification program
  • refresher course
  • reading teacher certification
This is one of the required courses for individuals pursuing reading teacher certification, WI 316
This course is an approved elective in the Master of Science in Education online degree program. 

Textbooks

Readings will be assigned from all of the following textbooks:
  1. Purchase this paperback:
    Blevins, W. (2006). Phonics from A-Z. (2nd ed.) New York, NY: Scholastic. ISBN:978-0-439-84511-3 Available from amazon.com
  2. Free download: National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) booklet entitled: Put reading first: The research building blocks for teaching children to read 
    Download and print 56 pg. booklet color PDF (1.25 MB)
  3. An e-textbook will be provided after you login to the course. You may open the e-book to read online from your laptop or desktop. The e-textbook software is compatible with smartphones, an iPad, Kindle Fire or fully internet-capable device. It is not compatible with a Kindle Reader. 

    Temple, C., Ogle, D., Crawford, A., Freppon, P. (2014). All children read - teaching for literacy in today’s diverse classrooms (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Allyn Bacon. ISBN-13: 9780133066821

    If you prefer to read a hard copy of the textbook, instead of reading via your computer or tablet, you may purchase the book from http://www.mypearsonstore.com or by telephone 1-800-922-0579, or order online from amazon.com 
    Be sure to allow for delivery time, and note the ISBN number and 4th edition. 

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Analyze the major theories of language development, cognition, and learning.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of phonemic, morphemic, semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic cueing systems and their relation to the reading and writing process.
  3. Identify research-based instructional and assessment practices for promoting literacy development of beginning, developing and fluent readers and writers.
  4. Evaluate methods and materials that embrace and accept diversity.
  5. Summarize the effectiveness of instructional and information technologies to support literacy learning

Alignment with State and National Reading Standards

Course objectives are aligned with the following:
Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure, International Literacy Association's Standards for Reading Professionals (IRA 2010),  and the Content Guidelines for Reading Teachers State of Wisconsin - DPI (p. 180)
No travel to campus is required. 
This class is asynchronous and open to you 24/7. Participate from your home or work computer during hours that are best for your work and family schedule. 
Advanced computer or programming skills are not required. Learners need a basic understanding of Internet browsing, email, and word processing. 
The class is highly interactive with a significant discussion component. 
All discussion postings, projects, and assignments will be submitted via the course discussion board and Dropbox. Activities are conducted according to a schedule with specific due dates each week; there are no required "live" chat sessions. 
This class is a valuable first step for those interested in exploring a career as a reading teacher.

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The university reserves the right to cancel classes that do not meet minimum enrollment requirements.

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Enroll Today! Creating Collaborative Communities

Online Classroom: Creating Collaborative Communities

EDUC 761 Creating Collaborative Communities in E-Learning

Online Course 3 semester hours graduate credit
Instructor: Dr. Maryruth Hicks 
Summer: June 26 - August 18, 2017
  • Tuition is the same for Wisconsin residents, out-of-state and international students.
  • There is no registration fee and no program application.
  • E-textbook provided at no additional cost.
  • Includes full access to lynda.com self-paced video tutorials to help develop course management and other technology skills.

You Will

  • Design orientation activities for the first week in an online course.
  • Manage electronic communications.
  • Recognize characteristics of strong and weak discussion facilitation.
  • Apply facilitation techniques to deepen critical thinking.
  • Analyze, assess, and encourage learner participation in online discussions.
  • Demonstrate collaboration in online environments.
  • Analyze how Web 2.0 “tools” build online and blended community.
  • Represent your understanding of collaborative communities in your professional e-portfolio.

Description

Concepts, methods, and research for creating and facilitating a collaborative online community of practice.

Who Should Enroll

Educators and trainers interested in using blended or fully online delivery for courses or training, or adding web-based components to enhance face-to-face instruction.
Participants may include:
  • Technical and community college instructors (adjunct and full-time)
  • College and university professors (adjunct and full-time)
  • K-12 teachers (blended classrooms and virtual schools)
  • Clinical healthcare educators involved in patient education, healthcare education, continuing education or in-service education, community health education, or academic healthcare education
  • Trainers in corporations, professional associations, nonprofit organizations, government, and military
  • Curriculum consultants, professional development coordinators, and distance education and continuing education leaders
Enroll in the course to meet your goals for 
  • professional development
  • continuing education
  • license renewal
  • graduate credits to transfer to another university
  • an elective in the Master of Science in Education online degree.
This course is an approved elective in the Master of Science in Education online degree program and is the introductory course in the E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate.
The course is highly interactive with a significant discussion component.
All discussion postings, projects, and assignments will be submitted via the course discussion board and Dropbox.
Activities are conducted according to a schedule with specific due dates each week; there is one required live chat session in Week 7. Participants will determine a time that is convenient for all.
This class is essential for those who are interested in a career as an online instructor.
This is not a self-paced course.

e-Textbook

An e-textbook will be provided when you login to the course. You may open the e-book to read online from your laptop or desktop. The e-textbook software is compatible with an iPad, Kindle Fire or fully internet-capable device. It is not compatible with a Kindle Reader.
Lehmann, Kay and Lisa Chamberlin (2009). Making the Move to eLearning: Putting Your Course Online. Rowman & Littlefield Education Publishers. (Paperback) ISBN-13: 978-1-60709-041-0.
If you prefer to read a paperback textbook, instead of reading via your computer or tablet, you may purchase the book from amazon.com. 
Additional readings and lectures will be available online within the text of each module.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Develop a personal philosophy that reflects learning theory and guides online instruction that creates an environment for reflection, critical thinking, and collaboration.
  2. Analyze the role of the online facilitator and develop strategies to implement, encourage and manage interaction in the online classroom.
  3. Demonstrate appropriate planning considerations, guidelines and procedures to establish a productive, engaging e-learning environment.
  4. Frame critical thinking questions and design discussion prompts that lead to effective learning in the online classroom.
  5. Apply understanding of learner differences when facilitating an online community of practice.
  6. Evaluate application ideas for online discussions using recognized criteria and professional references and apply current research about successful teaching strategies to guide students before, during and after case scenarios, brainstorming, role playing and reaction postings.
  7. Develop a facilitation eportfolio of useful tools, tips, and facilitation techniques as well as the beginnings of 70-30 course preparation developed during the course.

Alignment with Standards

Course objectives are aligned with the International Society for Technology in Education, National Educational Technology Standards, (NETS-T) III, VI
No travel to campus is required. You may participate from your home or work computer during hours that are flexible and convenient for your work and family schedule.

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The School of Education reserves the right to cancel classes that do not meet minimum enrollment requirements.

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Contact Us: Dennis O'Connor, Program Advisor
E-learning and Online Teaching Certificate
Telephone: 530-318-1145
University of Wisconsin - Stout Menomonie, WI 54751
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Math Assessment for Response to Intervention (RtI)

Math Assessment for Response to Intervention (RtI)


EDUC 648 Math Assessment for Response to Intervention (RtI)

Online Course 2 semester hours graduate credit
Instructor: Sara Turansky

Summer: June 5 - July 14, 2017

You Will Learn

How to select and use assessment tools in mathematics to identify learning problems, to monitor student progress, and to implement Response to Intervention practices.

Who Should Enroll

  • Math specialists
  • Math coaches
  • Mathematics resource teachers
  • Math interventionists
  • Elementary, middle school, and high school math teachers
  • Title I math teachers
  • Special education teachers
  • School psychologists

Description

Principles of using universal screeners and curriculum-based measures (CBMs) to assess student performance in mathematics. Use of assessment tools in mathematics to identify learning problems, to monitor student growth, and to implement Response to Intervention practices.
Enroll in this online course to meet your goals for professional development, license renewal, or to complete graduate credits and transfer the credit to another university.
This is one of the required courses for individuals pursuing the Math Specialist Certificate.
This course is an approved elective in the Master of Science in Education online degree program. 

E-textbook

An e-textbook is included with the tuition, and you will access the e-textbook after you login to the course.
Hosp, M. K., Hosp, J. L., & Howell, K. W. (2016). The ABCs of CBM: A practical guide to curriculum-based measurement. (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Describe the essential elements of Response to Intervention (RtI).
  2. Identify multiple rationales for implementing the RtI model in PK-12 schools.
  3. Describe multiple rationales for periodic universal screenings in mathematics.
  4. Identify reliable and valid universal screening measures (CBM) of math by grade level.
  5. Justify multiple rationales for using curriculum-based measures (CBM) of mathematics.
  6. Examine reliable and valid curriculum-based measures (CBM) of mathematics by grade level.
  7. Administer and score curriculum-based measures (CBM) of mathematics.
  8. Graph CBM scores, interpret and communicate results.
  9. Critically analyze personal classroom practices and viewpoints regarding essential principles of Response to Intervention (RtI) and use of varied math assessments for progress monitoring.

Alignment with State and National Standards

Course objectives are aligned with the following:
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards 3, 4
Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure (WI DPI) 3, 8
International Society for Technology in Education, National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers 2d
No travel to campus is required. 
Participate from your home or work computer during hours that are best for your work and family schedule. 
The class is highly interactive with a significant discussion component. 
All discussion postings, projects, and assignments will be submitted via the course discussion board and Dropbox. 
Activities are conducted according to a schedule with specific due dates each week; there are no required "live" chat sessions. 

Sign Up Soon!

Register online
The School of Education reserves the right to cancel classes that do not meet minimum enrollment requirements.

For More Information

Request Information Online
Contact Us: School of Education
Online Professional Development
University of Wisconsin - Stout 
Menomonie, WI 54751
Phone: 715-232-2693
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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Teaching Digital Media Literacy - The Power of Primary Sources

Teaching Digital Media Literacy  - The Power of Primary Sources

EDUC 642
Teaching Digital Media Literacy  - The Power of Primary Sources

Online Course 2 semester hours graduate credit
Instructor: Mary Alice Anderson

Summer: June 12 - July 28, 2017

You Will Learn

  • How to locate and analyze quality web-based primary sources in multiple digital formats to support differentiated instruction and enhance your curriculum
  • How to apply learning activities that teach students to think critically and independently to construct new understandings from varied information sources.
  • Strategies for incorporating primary sources in varied formats, disciplinary literacy, inquiry and informational text in all content areas

Description

Research-based and practical strategies for analyzing, critiquing and engaging with informational digital text, video, images and diverse multimedia primary sources in the classroom to stimulate inquiry, creativity, and critical thinking.
You may enroll in this course to meet your goals for professional development, license renewal, or to complete graduate credits and transfer the credit to another university.

Who Should Enroll

Participants in the course may include:
  • K-12 teachers
  • Community college, higher education and continuing education faculty
  • Higher ed librarians and K-12 school library media specialists
  • National History Day educators
The course is especially helpful for
  • teachers of Advanced Placement classes and core content area teachers
  • educators addressing disciplinary literacy, state and national standards requiring the use of primary sources
  • educators incorporating inquiry and informational text reading skills, and those working with National History Day activities.
Digital primary sources from The Library of Congress (LOC), the LOC's professional development program, and the Digital Public Library of America will be incorporated.
Random Thoughts: Change, Primary Sources & Other Stuff
Blog postings by the instructor, Mary Alice Anderson

Textbook

There is no required textbook. All readings will be provided online.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Critically analyze and apply evidence-based digital media literacy research when selecting and integrating primary sources in the development of learning activities.
  2. Model how to access primary source digital online repositories and how to select the appropriate search strategy to access resources in complex archival primary source databases and collections.
  3. Model the inquiry process with a content-related research question and critically analyze the authority and reliability of information and make comparisons between collections.
  4. Demonstrate how to determine the effectiveness of primary source learning objects in meeting learning outcomes and how to integrate universal design for diverse learning styles.
  5. Advocate and model legal and ethical practices related to copyright laws and citation of digital media sources according to type of media.
  6. Analyze developmentally appropriate instructional strategies for interpreting, organizing and interacting with learning objects found in digital media primary sources.
  7. Develop interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary instructional activities using primary sources to enhance understanding in a variety of subject areas that may include science, math, social studies, language arts, the arts, family and consumer science education, marketing and business education, media production, gifted and talented, special education and technology education.
  8. Integrate a variety of digital media primary resources from local community, state, or national archives to demonstrate the impact of instruction on learning in a field based setting and interpret field test results.

Alignment with Teaching Standards

Course objectives are aligned with the following teaching standards:
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards 4, 5
Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure (WI DPI) 4, 6, 7, 9

Wisconsin Model Academic Standards Information and Technology Literacy
B. 12.2 Analyze primary and secondary sources related to a historical question to evaluate their relevance, make comparisons, integrate new information with prior knowledge and come to a reasoned conclusion.
International Society for Technology in Education, National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers 2, 3, 4
American Association of School Librarians, Standards for the 21st-Century Learner. 1.1, 2.1, 2.2,
National Council for Social Studies Curriculum Standards and the National Standards for History

Sign Up Soon!

Register online
The School of Education reserves the right to cancel classes that do not meet minimum enrollment requirements.

For More Information